1. Check the Main Recruiters

Before you even start your job search, you should have a look at who the big players in the audit recruitment business are. Have a look at their websites, and get to grips with the terminology of recruiters: track record, cover letter... That way, you can start getting into the jobseeker frame of mind and talk to audit employers on their level. Remember that even though you are searching for a job on the internet, impressions are very important and the way you write/structure your emails and corespondance will reflect your personality.


2. Find your 'Niche' Website

Once you know the ins and outs, the dos and don'ts of applying for jobs online, you can start looking for the website that will offer the job you are looking for. In order to do so, the best thing to do is use search engines like Google and look for "[your dream job name] positions" (or jobs, vacancies). That way, you are sure you will find a website that bears many job offers and not just a few. Niche job websites usually have some information about the best things to do when applying or submitting a CV, so make sure you read them as they know what they are talking about!


3. Browse the Offers

When you are on the website, looking to send in your details to the employers, make sure you take your time. If you see a job you like, write down the reference, the URL, or simply the title; anything that you can use to find the web page later. Then, go on and look for more similar vacancies. If you have several, you will be able to save some time when you apply. Furthermore, two different employers will write different job specs for the same positions, so it can be very good to read several job descriptions before applying so you can get a real idea of what is required from you in that position. Last but not least, you can compare salary expectations...


4. Tailor Your CV

Not enough people do this systematically, but it still is the first thing to do if you want the employer to keep reading your CV past the first 5 lines. First of all, you need to relate to the job on offer at the top of your page to get an employer's attention: In your Job title, replicate the exact job title mentioned in the a you are replying to. Then, make sure the rest of your CV actually promotes you as well: look at the keywords and 'required attributes' in the job description (attention to detail, knowledge of..., experience in..., good team-player...) and try and tweak the descriptions of your professional work experience to point in those directions. For example if you worked in a sports superstore when you were 16, you can put something like "in depth knowledge of sports equipment and the leisure industry". You need to tailor your CV for every single different job you apply for. You can simply type over the words that need replacement everytime, and then save your document.


5. Get a Proper Email Address!

Recruiters get a lot of emails everyday. They send huge amounts too. If they cannot find your email in their inbox because you sent it from 'crazypartydude@universitylife.com' then it's your fault! It is good practice to have two email addresses: one for personal use, and one for professional functions like looking for a suitable vacancy. Ideally, the professional one should be Name.Surname@internet.com. Not only is it a way to present yourself well, but the recruiter will remember you because he clicked your name, and that's exactly what you want!

 

Good luck and get surfing!

 

 

Written by Jonathan Hickstead for CareersinAudit.com.


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